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One of our grandsons is enamored with cars.

When we visited him in Reno last month he told us his one of his favorite pastimes was looking at all of the cars at the local museum. So off we went to downtown Reno.

The National Automobile Museum is one of the top auto museums in the USA where more than two hundred vintage autos are on display. Many of these were from the extensive collection of William Harrah, the founder of Harrah’s Casino.

We spent an afternoon walking through the museums’s four spacious halls arranged by era – 1890-1910, 1910-1930, 1930-1950 and 1950 to present.

You couldn’t help but be impressed by the immaculate restoration of so many of the vehicles. I snapped many pictures of automobiles that afternoon. But the ones that I liked the most were the shiny, cool hood ornaments that adorned the vehicles.

Below are some of my favorites.




 
 

You can learn more about the National Automobile Museum here.

Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 

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Not Quite Magic, But Amazing Nonetheless

 
Like many photography buffs, I subscribe to Adobe Creative Cloud that provides me a set of applications for editing my images. For all of the years that I’ve been using the computer for photography, I’ve never been a regular user of Photoshop. While I’ve used it on occasion I’ve instead relied on the company’s younger offspring Lightroom for most of my image editing.

As a subscriber I receive regular electronically delivered newsletters about Creative Cloud. A few weeks ago one of the articles drew my interest – colorizing black and white images.

Those of us who grew up taking pictures in the 1950s and 1960s have a large stash of black and white photos – and I have my share. I clicked on the article to find out more about this magical process.

The process involved using one of Photoshop’s built-in filters. Being a Photoshop novice I was unfamiliar with these filters so I had to dig deeper.

Well it turns out that I didn’t have to dig very much. The newsletter explained that the only thing I needed to do was to choose “Neural Filter” from Photoshop’s top menu and then click the “Colorize” button. Instantly – yes instantly – the black and white photo was converted to a color version.

The images are colorized using a best guess model that Adobe employs. The processing is not perfect but most of the images that I tried turned out acceptable. The few inconsistencies that I noticed did not detract from the overall results. And a few of the colorized images exceeded my expectations.

Below are a few of the B&W’s – including some of my favorites – that I was anxious to try.
 


 

Click on any image to see more detail.

 

A photo of my Grandmother and two uncles taken in the 1950s.

The colorized version fails to maintain consistent color of the suits.


A high school photo of a student from the 1960s.

The colorized version is good except the student didn’t use lipstick.


Writer William F Buckley lecturing at the Univ of Michigan in 1969.

Above you will notice that the background does not maintain the same color.


Hockey star Tim Horton sitting in the penalty box at Madison Square Garden about 1964.

The color processing chose blue for Tim’s jersey which happens to be the color of the Toronto Maple Leaf uniform. Good guess.


Singer Ron Townsend of the Fifth Dimension performing in Ann Arbor in 1970

An amazing transformation. I don’t know if the colors are accurate to his 1970’s outfit but they appear authentic.


A snapshot of my wife while we were enjoying nature and the outdoors in 1969.

Photoshop’s choice of colors is less important to me than the warm feeling that I receive from the colorized photo.


 
 
I’m still excited when I find another older black & white photo that I can colorize.

 
 
Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 


 
 

Video Roundup

05th February 2023

Organizing videos from past years

 :
My collection of digital photographic files on my hard drive starts in 1998.

Since then I’ve been trying to keep the image files organized by date and event.
 




Within my PhotoArchive1 folder are more than 63,000 digital images that I’ve taken from 1998 through 2010. This folder is subdivided into folders arranged by year and some folders are further subdivided by month, day and event name.


 
Since it’s inception I’ve used Adobe Lightroom to organize and edit most of my photographs. As an ardent user of Lightroom I’ve benefited from the new and powerful features that Adobe continues to add to this software. I’ve spent many, many hours using Lightroom to tag the images and can now easily search for images by date, name, event, category, more.

Two weeks ago as I was going through these older images I realized that I haven’t done a good job organizing the videos that were taken at the same times as the still photos. I’m now reminded that video recording was missing from the digital cameras that I used. It wasn’t until about 2004 that my first digital camera had video capability. These videos were small sized producing 320 x 216 resolution movies. By about 2006, the resolution of my movies jumped to about 640 x 480. Since then resolution has grown by leaps and bounds with many non-professional cameras offering 1920 x 1080 and some even having 4K resolution of 3840 x 2160.

Let’s get back to my past videos. I use Lightroom to easily spot the videos. then I make digital copies of all of these videos with a set of filenames that clearly identifies the date of the recording.




With Lightroom I’m looking at the contents of the 040523_Birthday folder where I see two videos files – one 9 seconds and another 15 seconds in length. From here I Export a copy of these videos and separately rename them with a prefix of 2004_04_ to make it easy to determine the date taken.


 
I repeated the process of Exporting the videos from Lightroom from each folder. This took many hours over a several day period. When I finished, I had processed more than 1150 videos.


Above you can see a group of the renamed exported videos. All of these videos (more than 1000) are now in a single folder that other members of the household can view at their leisure.


 


The year and month prefix (in this example 2010_09_) help to put the videos into a chronological context but is not helpful otherwise. However the small thumbnail photo provides a better way to key in on the contents of the video. It’s not perfect, but is certainly a better way than keeping the videos hidden within my PhotoArchive1 folder.

Would you be surprised to learn that I have never viewed many of these videos? Up to now I have concentrated on the still images in my large collection and have largely ignored the videos. With my videos now more organized I am anxious to view these “motion pictures” – some going back almost 20 years.

One of my future missions is to uncover the videos that I took from 2011 to the present.
 
 
Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 

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